Invasion of Babur forgotten by Delhi University, Twisted History presented to Students

Students pursuing BA under Delhi University are effected by the recent change in syllabus. Students were told that the mid-semester changes will be minor. However, they were not. It is noticed that the changes pertain only to BA program students leaving the honours students uneffected.

Universities and education councils have been constantly trying to rewrite history for more than a year. Amidst everything, the changes in History syllabus of DU went unnoticed. The changes may be minor or immaterial but its effect on exam period and content is definitely significant.

Earlier the History paper covered Indian History from 1550 to 1605 CE which is now increased to 1500 to 1600 CE. This makes an impression that it covers everything from downfall of Delhi Sultanate to establishment of Mughal Empire and its fall. Alas, that is just an illusion. By sifting through the content, one can easily conclude that a major portion of earlier syllabus has been trimmed.

Previous syllabus with its not-so-vast period had 6 units while the present syllabus, that covers a wide period has 5 units.

The establishment of Mughal Empire and that of Sur Empire are completely omitted. One of the main phase of Indian History has been excluded from the syllabus with Babur’s invasion, Humayun’s flight, return of Humayun and administrative changes made by Sher Shah Suri.

New syllabus was first implemented on 2016-2019 batch in their fourth semester from January, 2018 onwards. Students studied the establishment of Mughal Empire in the third semester but never got to study its fall.

The revision and omission in the syllabus is an effect of politics. For long, the Mughals have been called plunders and traitors by BJP government. According to the political party, Taj Mahal does not represents Indian culture or heritage. It can be inferred that the change in syllabus is not an isolated incident where the Mughals are targeted and shown in bad light.

This is certainly leading to a generation with low historic awareness, of which the Padmaavat episode is a proof.