India’s Daughter

The BBC released documentary based on the Delhi rape case of 16 December 2012 has now become as controversial as the rape case itself. The social media sites and TV is flooded with news and posts about the documentary and whether government is justified in banning the documentary in India. Banning has become an invisibility cloak for the government under which it is trying to hide its imperfections and disabilities, but now Nirbhaya and India’s Daughter has already risen up to a high level of upsurge that banning a documentary would not help.
It is a request to everyone to watch the documentary if you haven’t as of now. While watching it, listening to the lewd mentality of those criminals who were involved in this case and surprisingly also the orthodox, patriarchal and sexist view of the lawyers in defence will for sure enrage every human being on this planet. The accused of the crime believes that a girl enjoys rape and if raped she should submit so as to survive. The shocking most view is of the two lawyers who are defending the accused by saying that “our culture doesn’t have a place for women”. Such comments and statements underline the fact that the problems why Delhi has become the rape capital doesn’t lie in the fact that the girl was dressed in western clothes or was drunk or was out at night, but the rape happens because of such mentality which considers women as a “plaything”.
The lawyers of the nation who are representatives of justice in a country are of the view that if a girl wears provocative clothes, has male friends before marriage and roams outside in evening, she herself invites rapists. This is the most gruesome part of the reality. Such mind-sets need to be broken and people like the accused as well as these sexist orthodox people need to be taught a lesson of what “equality” actually means.
On one part of the documentary we are introduced to Nirbhaya’s parents and they share their grief and on the other hand, we are also introduced with the accused who do not have a sense of guilt or shame in their eyes. For them, what they did was normal and Nirbhaya deserved it because “she was out with her male friend at night”. Even the lawyers acclaim that “a girl and a boy can never be friends and it was wrong on Nirbhaya’s part”. Such statements indeed flare up one’s heart and bring us to the central question which is also posed by Nirbhaya’s father: “What is the worth of woman? What is her place in society?”Being a woman is NOT a crime. Women are EQUAL to men. The disparity lies in the poor level of thinking and orthodox beliefs of some people that has to be reshaped by us, the youth of India.
The banning of the documentary would not help the government to cover up the topic. Yes, the documentary is very gruesome and moving but one has to watch this to understand the level of humanity left in people. Nirbhaya is no more, she lost her battle but the demons who raped and killed her brutally are still breathing freely and it is a shame for every Indian if they get away with this crime. Rapes will not stop unless there is a strict penal action taken for this crime. Whether it is the juvenile or the others, whether it is Nirbhaya or all the pending rape cases in India, every WOMAN demands justice and the government has to provide an answer.
Nirbhaya hasn’t died, she lives through every Indian girl and woman and she demands justice.
She is the bravest of all. She is #IndiasDaughter.

Jaskiran Kaur is student of Kamala Nehru College, University of Delhi, pursuing B.A Hons in English.