Survey reveals only 22.4% DU Students able to attend all online classes

A survey conducted by All India Students Association (AISA) among a base sample of 1500 DU students has shown concerning results the findings of the survey cast considerable doubts on the efficacy of the online method DU has adopted. The findings show how the DU Administration has approached education from a very privileged perspective and ignored how not everyone in a public university can have access to the internet, especially during times of pandemic and lockdown.

The survey says that only 44.4% of the students surveyed are in colleges and courses where all subjects are being taught through online class and 41.2% of the students are not even able to attend the online class. The major reason for not being able to attend classes is poor connectivity among 72.2 % of the students. 29.4% of the students don’t have study materials. When it comes to the idea of online exams which DU has been suggesting and will likely implement, 74% of the students said they would have a problem appearing for the same with 32.4% not even having access to the technology to appear for such exams. Another issue brought up by the survey is how a lot of students are struggling to pay rent with the disruption to finances.

AISA’s DU unit in a statement along with the survey has pointed out that “The summarised qualitative data reveals disturbing conclusions which has been provided in the subsequent posters/images. AISA-DU has always stood with the student community uncompromisingly.Along with a staunch adherence for accountability and democratisation of the organisation with the student community, AISA-DU will continue to keep this struggle no matter how dire the situation might get. In continuation with this struggle, we will come up with a statement soon on the basis of the concrete analysis of the survey and the demands posed by the student community.”

On speaking to Damni Kain, a student activist in DU about the situation and the findings of the survey, she points out several issues. She says “From the point of view of a student, a lot of us are in extreme confusion. We’re given no idea about what possible options we have regarding our academics including our exams. Some kind of assurance from MHRD or administration could have helped us. Online classes are happening for few. Anyway online mode is inaccessible for so many because of several reasons including network connectivity, financial reasons (many do not have a wifi system back at home) , household chores. In a patriarchal society, there is a highly unequal burden of household chores on women students due to which being present at the time of an online lecture is not always possible.Conducting online exams can turn out to be a big fiasco for the university system.
So many had faced problems to pay the PG rent.Administration and MHRD should understand the plight of students (including their mental health) who are clueless about so many important things concerning their future and should take adequate steps to address them.”

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